Non-Saccharomyces Yeast: Complexity & Sweetness

Non-Saccharomyces Yeast - Complex & Sweetness

This is the second article in my series on non-Saccharomyces yeast. In the first, I challenged the concept that Saccharomyces yeast is ideal for cider. While yeast is a critical element that defines the essence of cider, I asserted the view that we needed to break away from our current beliefs about yeasts. I proposed … Continue reading Non-Saccharomyces Yeast: Complexity & Sweetness

Cider Question: Do I need to use Campden (sulfite)?

Sulfite addition to cider

The simple answer is “no”. Campden, potassium metabisulfite, sulfite, sulphite, or whatever name or compound you use, it is not needed. This is especially true if you are unsure why you are adding it. As a general rule, if you don’t understand why you are adding something to your cider, don’t add it. This is … Continue reading Cider Question: Do I need to use Campden (sulfite)?

Non-Saccharomyces Yeast: Defining Cider from a Cider-Makers Perspective

Defining Cider

What is the best yeast to use to make cider? The answer is simple. Whichever yeast creates the hard cider you most enjoy. Okay, I took the non-confrontational path but, it’s true. If you make cider you love from wine yeast, use it. If beer yeast makes the cider of your dreams, use it. If … Continue reading Non-Saccharomyces Yeast: Defining Cider from a Cider-Makers Perspective

Cider Question: When should I rack my cider?

RackongnCider

Racking your hard cider simply means to siphon off the cider leaving the bottom layer of sediment behind. To answer the question of when you should rack your cider, I first need to review the definition of sediment and lees. Apple juice contains a variety of organisms and compounds. Many of these precipitate or drop … Continue reading Cider Question: When should I rack my cider?

Cider Fundamentals: Blending Common Apples to Make Cider

Blending common Apples

Many of us struggle to find true Bitters, which are apples that are high in tannins. Some call these cider apples because making cider is often the only good use for them. However, we should really be thinking of apples as Bitters, Sharps, and Sweets or a combination of these like Bittersweets and Bittersharps. The … Continue reading Cider Fundamentals: Blending Common Apples to Make Cider

Cider Question: Can hard cider go bad?

Bad Cider

When people ask if their hard cider can go bad, they are often worried that it might spoil or turn into something that would make them ill. Usually, the cider in question is often sitting in a bucket and has a crust of white or even a moldy film or layer on top of it. … Continue reading Cider Question: Can hard cider go bad?

Non-Saccharomyces Yeast: Hanseniaspora uvarum Results

Hanseniaspora uvarum Test Results

I was able to assess three Hanseniaspora uvarum yeast strains from the USDA culture collection for use in cider making. I provided a detailed overview on these and other non-Saccharomyces strains in earlier articles. Just search for non-Saccharomyces on the site or look in the post carousal below for the links. Hanseniaspora uvarum is a … Continue reading Non-Saccharomyces Yeast: Hanseniaspora uvarum Results

Cider Question: Do I need to use yeast nutrient?

The Need for Yeast Nutrient in Cider

Many cider recipes call for the addition of yeast nutrient when adding yeast. Do you really need to add yeast nutrient to make cider? The short answer is no but, as you might expect, there are always details and nuances involved when answering most questions about cider. The need for yeast nutrient is usually a … Continue reading Cider Question: Do I need to use yeast nutrient?

Malolactic Fermentation and Citric Acid

Understanding the impact of Malolactic Fermentation to Citric Acid

Malolactic Fermentation or what is often referred to simply as MLF, is the process where lactic acid bacteria converts malic acid to lactic acid. For cider makers, MLF can be a very important process because apples are high in malic acid. As a result, MLF can reduce the acidity found in hard cider made from … Continue reading Malolactic Fermentation and Citric Acid

Cider Question: Can I use culinary and eating apples to make cider?

Using Culinary Apples for Cider

I don’t have classic cider apples growing around me. I have found some wonderful American heirloom varieties but, even those aren’t considered true cider apples. Most people have access to a wonderful range of cooking apples like Granny Smith and Bramley or eating apples like Red Delicious, Fuji, and Gala. Unless you live in certain … Continue reading Cider Question: Can I use culinary and eating apples to make cider?